Eric Lefkofsky seeks to make instantly available power of full-scale medical studies

The best way that medicine has to understand the world is through the use of statistical methods that were largely developed throughout the latter half of the nineteenth and early half of the 20th century. Almost all knowledge that modern medicine uses is result of careful studies carried out by researchers. This can be seen in everything from the mortality rates of cancer to the treatment protocols for heart disease, the latter of which was largely the product of one major study called the Framingham Heart Study.

But the problem with coming about medical knowledge by this means is that it’s both extremely expensive and extremely slow. It also requires the dedication of thousands of man hours just to carry out a single study. One man, Eric Lefkofsky, has a new conception of how doctors may be able to come about medical knowledge at a rate far eclipsing anything previously possible. Through the use of modern data analysis techniques, such as artificial intelligence, Lefkofsky is devising a system, through his company, Tempus, that will someday allow physicians to ask virtually any question regarding treatment, patient profiles and disease types and instantly be able to hash out the relationships that exist between those things. What’s more, they will be able to do this without having to resort to literature generated from expensive and time-consuming studies and learn more about Eric.

One of the ways in which Lefkofsky plans on accomplishing this is through the use of human genomics. Lefkofsky has stated that the exponential decline in the cost of sequencing the human genome has resulted in the ability of almost anyone to have their full genome sequenced. This wealth of new data will enable doctors to gain an understanding more nuanced than anything previously imaginable. Phenomena that have previously baffled the medical profession will now become easily answered. Questions such as why one cohort of patients reacts positively to a chemotherapy drug while another does not respond to it or is plagued by horrible side effects will become instantly answerable and what Eric knows.

Lefkofsky believes that the systems being created by Tempus will soon be utilized by almost all oncologists and many physicians in the United States and Eric’s lacrosse camp.

More Visit: http://lefkofskyfoundation.com/about-eric-lefkofsky/

The Life of Clay Siegall

Clay Siegall’s life begins in college. While studying zoology at the University of Maryland, one of his family members falls ill. Although the disease was killing, it was the treatment regimen Clay found brutal. At one point, their chemotherapy treatment made them sicker and they developed severe anemia and nearly died.

While watching his loved one suffer, he thought there must be a better way. He began searching all other treatment options, but he only found those that involved radical surgery and amputation. Inspired by the brutal suffering of a family member, Siegall became obsessed with finding better treatments.

After graduating from Maryland, he enrolled at George Washington University. There, he earned a Ph.D. in genetics and started his career. He’s always loved medicine and technology, and he thought working with Bristol was a great idea. That decision proved itself as one of the worse decisions he’s ever made.

The ownership of Bristol was terrible. Dr. Siegall was a senior researcher with very little authority. He didn’t have as much autonomy on projects as he wanted. Much of the time, he felt disrespected and underappreciated by the ownership. He even felt used and mistreated.

Bristol turned out to be focused on making money. That’s not why Dr. Clay Siegall got into drug development, so he didn’t fit in. At one point, he earned the company $80 million, and he didn’t see a dime of it. Fed up with being used and abused, he decided to become his own boss.

In 1998, he founded Seattle Genetics. Now, he used his love of medicine and technology to overcome disease. He truly explored the possibilities of intervening in nature’s course and bringing people back from the brink of certain death. To this day, money plays a small role in much of Seattle Genetic’s drug development.

Within the first few years, Seattle Genetics grew into one of the top companies in the targeted drug therapies industry. It was also the first company to develop the first FDA-approved antibody drug conjugate (ADC).